Sustainability Report 2011
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Greening and Landscaping

In 2010-11, ArchSD has continued to include roof greening where practicable in new government buildings which have usable roof area, and encourage the management departments of existing government buildings to consider the installation of green roofs whenever there are major works involving the roofs of the buildings concerned. ArchSD has also continued to explore opportunities for vertical greening in new government buildings and, with the accumulation of experience of successful installations, has encouraged the management departments of existing government buildings to consider installing vertical greening whenever practicable. In 2011-12, ArchSD will continue to encourage roof greening and vertical greening wherever practicable when giving advice to other government bureaux/departments, and to monitor the performance of roof greening and vertical greening applications in our projects.

As an ongoing initiative, ArchSD will continue to enhance greening and landscaping through maximisation of greenery coverage, including roof greening and vertical greening. On the enhancement of practices on tree management, ArchSD will pursue the various initiatives following the policy directives and guiding requirements from the Tree Management Office of Development Bureau. ArchSD will continue to carry out tree risk assessment in 2011-12 for the trees under its maintenance jurisdiction and those within the construction sites of its new works projects. ArchSD will continue to liaise closely with related professional institutes and organisations to enhance partnership and collaboration in promoting greening, landscaping and tree management in the industry and, where opportunities arise, will conduct seminars and workshops for experience sharing.

From 2001 to March 2011, ArchSD completed roof greening on 100 new buildings and 65 existing buildings and vertical greening on 14 new buildings. Energy is saved as a result as the greenery can reduce the solar heat transfer to buildings. The amount of energy saved depends on the shape of the building and the sun path over it, depth of the insulating planting soil and the type of greening.

Case Study - Redevelopment of Lo Wu Correctional Institution

Project Description:

The redevelopment comprises three new correctional facilities which include two medium-security and one minimum-security facilities with a capacity to accommodate 1,400 inmates. The new institution provides better facilities for inmates' rehabilitation, including a multi-media education centre, vocational training workshops, parent-child centres, recreational facilities, multi-purpose classrooms and counselling rooms.

Greening and Landscaping Features:

With careful site planning for this redevelopment project, the institution maximized the land-use and at the same time achieved a high level of greening despite various tight design guidelines for a correctional institute.

The design demonstrated a high degree of coherence between building structures with the existing rural setting. Vertical greening was provided at the retaining wall and soft landscaping was extensively applied at open area near the dormitories and buildings outside the security zone. In addition, green roofs were also provided at the dormitory blocks in order to reduce the heat gain of the building structure. With proper planning and placement of trees, shrubs and turf, the premises demonstrated a balance of the landscape with the environment.

Vertical Greening on the Retaining Wall
Vertical Greening on the Retaining Wall

Case Study - HKSAR's Participation in the World Exposition 2010 Shanghai, China
Hong Kong Pavilion

Project Description:

The design of the Hong Kong Pavilion originated from a Concept Design Competition staged by Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Bureau (CMAB) and ArchSD in 2008. ArchSD was responsible for the project management, from the Concept Design Competition, tendering and appointing the contractor to conduct the architectural design and construction, to project monitoring and supervision the building project.

The theme of the Pavilion is "Hong Kong – Potential Unlimited". The Hong Kong Pavilion was a three-storey building with an external aluminum and glass facade which showcased the infinite imagination and creativity of Hong Kong and its people in the World Exposition 2010 Shanghai. The Hong Kong Pavilion aimed to provide visitors with a stunning impression of Hong Kong as a modern, open, free and transparent society.

The Pavilion provided a total of 800 square metres of exhibition space, showing three exhibition themes namely "Connected to the Global Village", "Connected by Ideas, Information and Diversity" and "Connected to Nature" at three levels.

Greening and Landscaping Features:

The landscape design concept for the Hong Kong Pavilion was a celebration of the city's connectivity with the natural world. It showcased Hong Kong's rich natural heritage and the manner in which the dense urban cityscape co-exists sustainably with extensive swathes of greenbelt, wetland and woodland areas that cover almost 70 per cent of Hong Kong's land mass.

As such, we put substantial efforts in applying various landscaping features such as replicated wetland, shrubs, plantations and trees within the roof level of this modern structure. Visitors were surprised by the extent of natural landscape showcased in the Pavilion during their visits.

Highlights of the greening and landscaping features demonstrated in the Hong Kong Pavilion were:

  • External pavers at ground level are recycled products consisting of recycled glass and aggregates. The pavers can remove air pollutants and significantly improve the air quality. With the incorporation of Titanium Dioxide (TiO2), they are capable of removing Nitrous Oxides (NOx), a major air pollutant and greenhouse gas, by at least 10%;
  • Solar panels on the roof provide a sustainable energy source i.e. electricity for the landscape lighting on roof;
  • Intimate natural wetland on roof of Hong Kong Pavilion, with miniature of aquatic, semi-aquatic and terrestrial habitats in the same area;
  • Simple planter trays set on rooftop planted with low maintenance requirement species act as an insulation layer to reduce direct sunlight absorption by the concrete roof slab;
  • Installation of Plasma Huts with multimedia effect and able to be viewed in different heights for users including people with disability, to showcase the variety of Hong Kong Wetland animals to the visitors;
  • Installation of sky tubes and perforated aluminium claddings to allow natural lights entering the interior of the Hong Kong Pavilion
  • Water elements such as the two vertical cascades down the facade improve the micro-climate around the Pavilion; and
  • Folded aluminium cladding, which is detached from the glass enclosure to allow air to flow over the glass surface and helps to cool the building in hot weather.
Water Cascade along south facade
Water Cascade along south facade
Perforated Panel to allow natural lights entering the interior of the Hong Kong Pavilion
Perforated Panel to allow natural lights entering the interior of the Hong Kong Pavilion
Perforated Panel to allow natural lights entering the interior of the Hong Kong Pavilion
Artificial aquatic habitat intimate natural wetland environment
Artificial aquatic habitat intimate natural wetland environment
Artificial aquatic habitat intimate natural wetland environment
Aquatic plants used on roof
Aquatic plants used on roof
Aquatic plants used on roof
Sky tube and timber deck
Sky tube and timber deck
Sky tube and timber deck
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Installation of Plasma Huts with multimedia effect and able to be viewed in different heights for users including people with disability, to showcase the variety of Hong Kong wetland animals to the visitors
Installation of Plasma Huts with multimedia effect and able to be viewed in different heights for users including people with disability, to showcase the variety of Hong Kong wetland animals to the visitors
Solar Panel on roof with roof greening
Solar Panel on roof with roof greening
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